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One News Now

President of North Carolina Family Policy Council to Step Down

By L.A. Williams, Correspondent
Christian Action League
January 22, 2013

NCFPCRALEIGH — “A choice servant of Christ who took the North Carolina Family Policy Council from a fledgling and relatively unknown public policy organization to a major playor in Tar Heel politics” — that’s how the Rev. Mark Creech describes NCFPC President and Executive Director Bill Brooks, who announced this week that he’ll leave the organization at the end of August.

Dr. Creech, executive director of the Christian Action League, said Brooks came on the scene in the 1990s at a time when there were very few voices speaking out in favor of Christian values and that he had made a significant impact for the kingdom.

“I believe that eternity will show us that Bill Brooks is responsible for an incredible amount of good that was sustained, protected or advanced because of his influence,” said Dr. Creech.

Brooks said in a press release that he had enjoyed the chance to work with hundreds of lawmakers and thousands of NCFPC supporters for nearly 20 years.

“It has been a joy to be engaged with wonderful colleagues as we work on so many issues that are critical to families across our state,” said Brooks, who has also led North Carolina Family Action, the organization’s 501(c)(4) grassroots affiliate since its inception in 2007.

Beginning his public policy career in 1988 with the N.C. Citizens for Business and Industry, Brooks came to NCPFC in 1993 as a consultant and was named director the following year. Over the past two decades he has four times been recognized as one of the 50 most influential lobbyists and has conducted more than 700 weekly radio show interviews for Family Policy Matters as well as writing research papers, legislative briefs and more for the council’s magazine.

“Bill Brooks is an individual with a unique set of gifts and abilities. I have always felt that God sent him our way as we ended our second year of operation. The organization that the council has become is a reflection of Bill’s character and the hard work by Bill and the remarkable team that he was able to assemble over the past two decades,” said Dick Douglas, chairman emeritus of NCFPC. “He will be missed.”

N.C. Family Action chairman Skip Orser praised Brooks’ “calm manner and thoughtful approach to public policy.”

“His Christian faith is a large part of who he is and his willingness to give others the credit means that he has been able to accomplish a great deal for the council and for families across our state,” he added.

Dr. Creech also commended Brooks’ selflessness.

“On a personal level, I am indebted to Bill Brooks. When I first arrived in the halls of the North Carolina General Assembly as a lobbyist for the Christian Action League, I knew very little about the process,” he explained. “Bill was kind to me. He helped me learn the ropes and was not selfish with his expertise, but instructed his staff to find ways to work with the Christian Action League as a means of doubling our efforts.”

“Every genuine Christian who loves truth, righteousness, and longs to see our state and nation return to the values that made them great owes a debt to Bill Brooks,” Dr. Creech added. “I am proud to call him both my brother and friend. I will miss him by my side on the field of battle. And I earnestly pray God will use him in tremendous ways for the kingdom’s sake in whatever endeavor he takes on next. We should keep the North Carolina Family Policy Council in our prayers as they seek to find the individual to whom they will pass the baton.”